Pendennis Cocktail. Beitragsbild.

Pendennis Cocktail

| Keine Kommentare

Im Pendennis Club entstand zwar nicht der Old-Fashioned Cocktail, wohl aber um 1910 der Pendennis Cocktail, der als eine Kombination aus Gin, Apricot Brandy, Limettensaft und optionalen Peychaud’s Bitters zu überzeugen weiß.

Pendennis Cocktail.

Pendennis Cocktail.

70 ml Rutte Dry Gin
25 ml Scheibel Alte Zeit Apricot Brandy
20 ml Limettensaft
3 dash Peychaud’s Bitters

Zubereitung: Geschüttelt.

George R. Washburne & Stanley Bronner: Beverages De Luxe, 1911. Seite 61. The Pendennis Club.

George R. Washburne & Stanley Bronner: Beverages De Luxe, 1911. Seite 61. The Pendennis Club. [1]

Erstmalig haben wir den Pendennis Cocktail in Beverages de Luxe gefunden, erschienen im Jahr 1911, und zwar in Louisville, dort, wo sich der Pendennis Club befindet. In diesem Buch sind einzelne Bars aufgeführt, und jede von ihnen stellt einige Drinks vor, die bei ihnen ausgeschenkt werden. Auf Seite 61 stellt der Leiter des Pendennis Clubs, Louis Herring,  sechs in seinem Club servierte Mischgetränke vor: Ananias Punch, Lord Baltimore Cocktail, Old Fashioned Toddy, Pendennis Mint Julep, Pendennis Eggnog und den Pendennis Cocktail, der mit  dem Saft einer halben Limette, also ca. 15 ml, 20 ml ungarischen Abricotine und 60 ml Dry Gin zubereitet wird. [1] Abricotine ist ursprünglich ein Obstbrand aus walliser Aprikosen. [2] In diesem Rezept wird noch kein Bitter hinzugegeben. Dies erfolgt erstmals bei Charles H. Baker im Jahr 1939. Seine Rezeptur verlangt 60 ml Dry Gin, 30 ml Apricot Brandy, den Saft einer Limette, also ca. 30 ml, und 2 dash Peychaud’s Bitters. William Boothby verwendet 1912 eine Mischung aus 30 ml Plymouth Gin, 15 ml Apricot Brandy und 15 ml französischem Wermut. Er verweist ebenfalls auf den Pendennis Club. Jacques Straub nennt einen solchen Cocktail 1913 jedoch „Van Zandt Cocktail“.

Der Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky, um 1906.

Der Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky, um 1906. [3]

Der Pendennis Club Cocktail ist also im Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky entstanden. Bei der Rezeptur scheint es wie aufgezeigt ein paar Unklarheiten und Varianten zu geben. Wir halten uns an diejenige, die vom Leiter des Pendennis Clubs im Jahr 1911 mit seiner abgedruckten Unterschrift bezeugt ist, und erweitern sie um die von Charles H. Baker ins Spiel gebrachten Peychaud’s Bitters. Anstelle eines klaren Aprikosenbrandes verwenden wir einen Apricot-Brandy-Likör, der neben einem Aprikosenbrand auch Cognac, Rum, Zwetschgenwasser, Himbeergeist und Vanille enthält. Damit entfernt man sich fast schon zu weit von einem Apricotine. Doch wer ihn einmal probiert hat, wird unsere Wahl verstehen 🙂

Wann der Cocktail entstand, läßt sich nicht mit Sicherheit sagen, aber vermuten. Belegt ist er für das Jahr 1911. Jacques Straub war vor Louis Herring der Leiter des Pendennis Clubs. Als zwischen 1908 und 1910 in Chicago das Blackstone Hotel erbaut wurde, zog Jaques Straub nach Chicago, um für das Hotel den Weinkeller aufzubauen. 1913 veröffentlichte er sein Werk „A Complete Manual of Mixed Drinks“. Darin befindet sich der Pendennis Toddy, der Pendennis Cocktail hingegen fehlt. Sein Buch enthält seinen eigenen Angaben zufolge über 675 Rezepte von Mischgetränken, wie sie in den besten Hotels, Bars und Clubs serviert werden. [4] Bei solch einer Monographie wäre der Pendennis Cocktail sicherlich enthalten gewesen, hätte Jacques Straub ihn aus dem Pendennis Club gekannt. Das läßt vermuten, daß der Cocktail entstand, nachdem Jaques Straub den Pendennis Club verlassen hatte. Das schränkt die Entstehungszeit auf die Jahre 1910 oder 1911 ein.

Quellen
  1. George R. Washburne & Stanley Bronner: Beverages De Luxe. Louisville, The Wine And Spirit Bulletin, 1911.
  2. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abricotine: Abricotine.
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pendennis_club_c1906.jpg: The old Pendennis Club building in Louisville, Kentucky circa 1906.
  4. Jacques Straub: A Complete Manual of Mixed Drinks For All Occasions. This book contains over 675 clear and accurate directions for mixing all kinds of popular and fancy drinks, served in the best hotels, clubs, buffets, bars and homes. Added to this there is a splendid introduction on wines, their medicinal value, when and how to serve them, kinds and styles of glasses to use and other valuable information and facts of great importance to every user of wines and liquors. Chicago, R. Francis Welsh Publishing Co., 1913
Pendennis Cocktail.

Pendennis Cocktail.

Historische Rezepte

1911 George R. Washburne & Stanley Bronner: Beverages De Luxe. Pendennis Cocktail.

As Served at The Pendennis Club Louisville, Ky.

Fill mixing glass with shaved ice.
Juice of one-half lime.
One-third jigger Hungarian Apricot-
ine.
One jigger Dry Gin.
Stir and strain in cocktail glass.

1912 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks. Anhang. Pendennis Club Cocktail.

(LOUISVILLE, KY.)
One-quarter Apricot brandy, one-quarter French Vermouth, one-half
Coates Plymouth gin; shake well, and serve very cold.

1914 George R. Washburne & Stanley Bronner: Beverages De Luxe. Pendennis Cocktail.

Fill mixing glass with shaved ice.
Juice of one-half lime.
One-third jigger Hungarian Apri-
cotine.
One jigger Dry Gin.
Stir and strain in cocktail glass.

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 162. Pendennis.

Disuélvase 1/2 terrón de azúcar con po-
quito de agua en vaso grande.
Vasito de whiskey Bourbon.
Pedazo de hielo.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 66. Pendennis.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger        Apricot Brandy . . . . 1/4 jigger
.                       Fr. Vermouth . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1931 Albert Stevens Crockett: Old Waldorf Bar Days. Seite 167. Three-To-One.

Reminiscent of a favorite term among conservative
race-track bettors.

One-half Lime Juice
One-third Apricot Liqueur
Two-thirds Dry Gin
Frappé

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 131. Pendennis.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger        Apricot Brandy . . . . 1/4 jigger
.                       Fr. Vermouth . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1939 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 81. The Pendennis Club’s Famous Special.

To 1 jigger of dry gin add 1/2 jigger of the best dry apricot brandy
procurable. Squeeze in the juice of 1 lime or 1/2 a small lemon, strained
of course, and trim with 2 dashes of Peychaud’s bitters which has been
made for generations in New Orleans …. Split a ripe kumquat, now
available during the winter in most big grocery or fruit stores; take
out the seeds and put the 2 halves in a Manhattan glass. Stir the drink
like a Martini with lots of cracked ice and strain onto the golden fruit.
This is a sweeter Grande Bretagne, see Page 47.

Seite 47. Grande Bretagne.

THE GRANDE BRETAGNE COCKTAIL No. I, BEING to OUR
UNGOVERNED MIND ONE of the FIVE or SIX CHIEF COcKTAILS of the
WHOLE WIDE WORLD
One dank, chilly, and snow-carpeted day in January of 1931 we
wore out shoe leather, shins, and temper in the name of „history“ and
„art,“ hiking all over the Acropolis in Athens; skidding from the
Temple of Diana, around the Parthenon, and back down past the
Erectheum and its divine caryatids, and to our motor car and to
Athens proper. Here we met Eddie Hastings, now cruise director for
the M.S. BREMEN with Raymond-Whitcomb, and he told me about
the little Greek barkeep in his tiny bar and his miraculous inventions.
. . . This Grecian male had been abarring for over 40 years, man and
boy. During that time he had devoted 1/2 hr daily to the pardonable
indoor pastime of testing new and radical mixes all his own. The
Grande Bretagne Nos. I and II, were the final result – the pinnacle.
Using lime juice we found later is far better than lemon, although
lemon is plenty good enough. Use dry imported apricot brandy, never
the sweet syrupy American copy …. No. I: 1 jigger of the best dry
gin possible, 1/2 pony apricot brandy, 1/2 pony or so of strained lime or
lemon juice, 1 tsp of very fresh egg white, 1 dash of orange bitters.
Shake with lots of ice and turn into a chilled Manhattan glass. . . .
No. II: substitute kirschwasser for apricot brandy, omit orange bit-
ters – using 1 dash of peach bitters if available, or 1 tsp Cordial Médoc.
The domestic Bridge Table cocktail, the 3-to-One, both copy this
Grande Bretagne, but the apricot brandy content is too heavy, and no
mention is ever made that unless fine dry apricot brandy is used, the
result is sweet, abortive, disillusioning in the extreme. . . . It is amaz-
ing, though, how such a small amount of apricot or kirsch comes
zipping through to lend bouquet to this brisk drink.

1946 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 81. The Pendennis Club’s Famous Special.

To 1 jigger of dry gin add 1/2 jigger of the best dry apricot brandy
procurable. Squeeze in the juice of 1 lime or 1/2 a small lemon, strained
of course, and trim with 2 dashes of Peychaud’s bitters which has been
made for generations in New Orleans …. Split a ripe kumquat, now
available during the winter in most big grocery or fruit stores; take
out the seeds and put the 2 halves in a Manhattan glass. Stir the drink
like a Martini with lots of cracked ice and strain onto the golden fruit.
This is a sweeter Grande Bretagne, see Page 47.

Seite 47. Grande Bretagne.

THE GRANDE BRETAGNE COCKTAIL No. I, BEING to OUR
UNGOVERNED MIND ONE of the FIVE or SIX CHIEF COCKTAILS of the
WHOLE WIDE WORLD
One dank, chilly, and snow-carpeted day in January of 1931 we
wore out shoe leather, shins, and temper in the name of „history“ and
„art,“ hiking all over the Acropolis in Athens; skidding from the
Temple of Diana, around the Parthenon, and back down past the
Erectheum and its divine caryatids, and to our motor car and to
Athens proper. Here we met Eddie Hastings, now cruise director for
the M.S. BREMEN with Raymond-Whitcomb, and he told me about
the little Greek barkeep in his tiny bar and his miraculous inventions.
. . . This Grecian male had been abarring for over 40 years, man and
boy. During that time he had devoted 1/2 hr daily to the pardonable
indoor pastime of testing new and radical mixes all his own. The
Grande Bretagne Nos. I and II, were the final result – the pinnacle.
Using lime juice we found later is far better than lemon, although
lemon is plenty good enough. Use dry imported apricot brandy, never
the sweet syrupy American copy …. No. I: 1 jigger of the best dry
gin possible, 1/2 pony apricot brandy, 1/2 pony or so of strained lime or
lemon juice, 1 tsp of very fresh egg white, 1 dash of orange bitters.
Shake with lots of ice and turn into a chilled Manhattan glass. . . .
No. II: substitute kirschwasser for apricot brandy, omit orange bit-
ters – using 1 dash of peach bitters if available, or 1 tsp Cordial Médoc.
The domestic Bridge Table cocktail, the 3-to-One, both copy this
Grande Bretagne, but the apricot brandy content is too heavy, and no
mention is ever made that unless fine dry apricot brandy is used, the
result is sweet, abortive, disillusioning in the extreme. . . . It is amaz-
ing, though, how such a small amount of apricot or kirsch comes
zipping through to lend bouquet to this brisk drink.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 165. Pendennis Cocktail – 1.

1 oz. dry gin                                      Juice 1/2 lime
1/2 oz. apricot brandy                     1 dash Peychaud’s bitters
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 165. Pendennis Cocktail – 2.

1 oz. dry gin                                      1/2 oz. apricot brandy
                          1/2 oz. French vermouth
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 124. Pendennis Cocktail.

3/4 oz. Hungarian apricot brandy
1/2 oz. gin
Add the juice of one lime or lemon
2 dashes of Peychaud bitters
Pour the mixture over cracked ice,
strain into cocktail glasses.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 99. Pendennis Cocktail – 1.

1 ounce gin
1/2 ounce apricot brandy
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 dash Peychaud bitters
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 99. Pendennis Cocktail – 2.

1 ounce gin
1/2 ounce apricot brandy
1/2 ounce French vermouth
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones‘ Complete bartender’s Guide. Seite 362. Pendennis.

Cocktail Glass              Shake
1-1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz peach brandy
1 dash peach bitters
1 oz lemon (or lime) juice

Variation

1 oz gin
3/4 oz apricot brandy
3/4 oz dry vermouth

2009 Ted Haigh: Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails. Seite 228. The Pendennis Cocktail. 6 cl gin; 3 cl apricot brandy; 1-3 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters; 2 cl lime juice.

2014 David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald, Alex Day: Death & Co. Seite 148. Pendennis Club Cocktail. 2 ounces Plymouth gin; 3/4 ounce Pendennis mix; 3/4 ounce lime juice; 2 dashes House Peychaud’s bitters; garnich: 1 lime. Seite 284, Pendennis mix:  2 ounces simple syrup; 1 ounce Marie Brizard apricot liqueur; 2 teaspoons Marie Brizard crème de peche. Seite 284, House Peychaud’s bitters: 2 parts Peychaud’s bitters, 1 part The Bitter Truth creole bitters.

2016 André Darlington & Tenaya Darlington: The New Cocktail Hour. Seite 80. Pendennis Club. 60 ml Old Tom Gin (Hayman’s); 30 ml apricot brandy (Rothman & Winter); 22 ml lime juice; 3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters; garnish: lime wheel.

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Pflichtfelder sind mit * markiert. Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Sie dient lediglich dazu, daß wir gegebenenfalls direkt mit Dir Kontakt aufnehmen können. Wir nutzen die eingegebene E-Mailadresse zum Bezug von Profilbildern bei dem Dienst Gravatar. Weitere Informationen und Hinweise zum Widerrufsrecht finden sich in der Datenschutzerklärung .